Tag Archive | money

The Greater Good

Greater Good USC 13Nov

Last month, I had the pleasure of taking part in “The Greater Good.” This event, hosted by the University of South Carolina, was intended to help college students understand the benefits and challenges of working in the non-profit sector.

As part of the three-person panel, we were asked questions from the moderator and audience. The three of us gave our insight for all the questions asked, but we took turns who would answer first.

I came from a slightly different perspective since I don’t per se work for a non-profit. However, I guess I qualified to be on the panel because we do a bunch of stuff for no money! (And I did work for a church for four years, so that counts, too.)

I wanted to share my answers (and some of the wisdom from my co-panelists) to some really good questions.

Read more about my experiences working in the non-profit world…

FAQ: How Long Will You Need Financial Support?

checkbook sxchu_aeropw

I started working in Allendale in January 2011, and we started raising financial support the next month. Because I have only had part-time jobs (anywhere from one to four at any given time), we have needed additional support for these three years that we have lived in Allendale.

But now that Our Season in Allendale is coming to a close, some are wondering if we still need financial support, and if so, how long we will need it.   Read More…

Poverty Poll

My month of “reduced” blogging is done, since I was working on my novel (almost done!). Now that most of that writing is done, as well as football season, I hope to catch my breath a little this month. Thanks for giving me that leeway.

I did want to follow up with a poll from last month, where I asked you to give Just One Word that comes to mind when you think of poverty. Thanks to the 112 people who contributed.

Results

As a prompt, I gave 9 choices of words that I felt were most common. Of those 9 choices, the most common selected were:

  1. hopeless (20.5%)
  2. weak / powerless (12.5%)
  3. money / wealth (9.8%)

Almost half of the people who took the poll choose “Other” and wrote in their own words. The top write-ins were:

  1. sad (4.5%)
  2. poor (3.6%)
  3. despair (3.6%)
  4. hunger / hungry (3.6%)

Thanks for taking the time to think through this issue!

Related Links:

Book Donations: Thank You!

corner_image_mentor_leaderEarlier this month, I asked if anyone would consider donating copies of the book The Mentor Leader. I was overwhelmed at the response.

I asked for 20 copies, and people offered to help quicker than I could check my email and Facebook messages. Wow!

In fact, the response was so great that we have more books than I asked for. And that doesn’t include the money that I was sent in order to buy additional copies.

So here’s the new plan:

Click here to learn more. Plus, I have a simple question for you…

She Laughed at My Car

My Buick

A few weeks ago, I had to drive a few teenagers (2 guys who play football, and 1 young lady who plays volleyball) somewhere after school, and then bring them back. I knew the guys, but I had only spoken to the girl in passing.

When she got in my car (which is older than 90% of the football players that I coach), she asked whose car it was. I told her it was mine.

Then she started laughing.

Read to find out why, and what I said…

Poverty Impedes Cognitive Function

brain flickr Matthew_Purdy

Do you have simple solutions for people who are in poverty, such as:

  • “They need to make better choices.”
  • “They need to get a good education, and a job, and work harder.”
  • “Don’t they know that drugs are not the answer?”
  • “Why don’t they save some money, for future needs?”

Of course, these are right ideas. But you must admit that these ideas didn’t come to you in a vacuum. You were taught those ideas, and then had them modeled. And you were probably encouraged and supported to apply them to your life.

But what if you didn’t have those ideas taught and modeled and encouraged and supported? And what if you had a handful of pressures in your life (like week-to-week survival)? Do you think that you would make these good decisions?

Click here to learn more…

“What Can I Ask God to Supply for Your Staffing Needs?” — Questions You Can Ask a Missionary, Part 6

Our friends (and fellow missionaries) Keith and Lori Doster recently linked to an article about stressors that missionaries face. The original article is called 12 Questions You Can Ask a Missionary to Help Them Stay on the Field. Missionaries are not unique to these stressors; however, they do face them in situations where they often feel vulnerable and lonely.

If you know any missionaries, I encourage you to support and encourage them by asking one or more of these questions (but not all 12 at once!). For the sake of our friends, supports, and blog-readers, I wanted to proactively answer these questions over the next few months. (Of course, feel free to ask us these questions personally.)

question_mark_sign fotopedia Colin_K

Question 6:  “What specifically can I ask God to supply for your staffing needs?”

Soon after I started working in Allendale, God gave me a deeper understanding of Matthew 9:37:

“The harvest is plentiful, but the workers are few.”

I’m usually one who (relying on all my skills and know-how) wants to come into a situation and solve all the problems. Quickly, I learned that this was not going to happen in Allendale (just like it has never happened at any point in my life).

God helped me see that His kingdom work is abundant and is far beyond my personal story. On the same token, our work is an integral part of what He is doing.

Learn more about our team…

“How Is Your Support Level?” – Questions You Can Ask a Missionary, Part 1

Our friends (and fellow missionaries) Keith and Lori Doster recently linked to an article about stressors that missionaries face. The original article is called 12 Questions You Can Ask a Missionary to Help Them Stay on the Field. Missionaries are not unique to these stressors; however, they do face them in situations where they often feel vulnerable and lonely.

If you know any missionaries, I encourage you to support and encourage them by asking one or more of these questions (but not all 12 at once!). For the sake of our friends, supports, and blog-readers, I wanted to proactively answer these questions over the next few months. (Of course, feel free to ask us these questions personally.)

question_mark_sign fotopedia Colin_K

Question 1: “How is your support level these days?”

We get this question regularly from friends and supporters. I have a hard time answering, because I hate asking for money for ourselves. But I have to remember the words that Joseph Osborn (another friend and missionary) told me, “You are not asking for yourself. You are asking for the people of Allendale.”

Before I answer the question about our financial situation, let me give a little background.

Keep reading…

Fired Up to Serve

house_fire morgueFile Schick

Have you ever had your house catch on fire? Not just a small fire that scares you but you put it out quickly. I’m talking about a big enough blaze to burn most or all of your possessions, and leave you homeless.

I’ve had that happen. Twice.

The first time I was a baby, so I don’t remember much. The second time was just before my junior year in college. It was in the middle of football two-a-days, when lightning hit our rental house at about 10 PM. The three of us got out safely, but most of our stuff didn’t.

As dependents, we were covered under our parents insurance. But we couldn’t wait on a check from the adjuster. We needed stuff immediately, especially clothes. (Especially my roommate Chris. He ran outside in his boxers.) We spent much of the next two days talking to our parents and insurance companies, buying clothes, looking for a new place to live, and trying to still make some practices.

Even if you have insurance, having your home burn is downright inconvenient.

I’ll never forget the people who came through for us during that time. People gave us cash and gift cards. A local sporting store allowed us to get clothes, and pay for them months later. Friends let us crash on sofas, futons, and extra beds.

I hadn’t thought about that fire from August 1996 for a long time. But it all came back to me a few weeks ago, when I got a text from another Allendale coach.

What did that text say? Read on…

Wealth, Poverty, and Public Policy: 2 Controversial Videos and 2 Controversial Charts

I’m not going to comment much on the following videos and charts. And you may not find them interesting or worth arguing over. I don’t like or agree with everything in them.

But I think they are worth seeing because they challenge my thinking, and I think they will do the same for you.

Click here to learn more…

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